Free Seminars for County & Local Officials

The Right Tree, Planted in the Right Place, the Right Way – Living With Trees Post-Superstorm Sandy

The New Jersey Tree Foundation and Public Service Electric & Gas are offering FREE seminars on Planting the Right Tree in the Right Place in a post-Superstorm Sandy world. Topics include:

  • Planting the right tree, in the right place, the right way
  • The importance of mark-outs prior to planting
  • Tree pests, Community Forestry Management Plans
  • Vegetation management policies to ensure the safe and reliable delivery of electric service
  • The importance of species diversity& proper maintenance
  • Funding & programs
Who should attend? Mayors, DPW Supervisors, Environmental & Shade Tree Commissioners, County Officials and any other interested parties. Space is limited. First come first served.
 
Seminar #1 information:
Date:  Friday, September 26th
Time: Registration begins at 8:30 am. Program starts promptly at 9AM am and runs until 11:00am
Place: Passaic County Public Safety Academy, 300 Oldham Road, Wayne, NJ.
Light refreshments will be served.
This seminar is worth 2 Continuing Education Units for towns with a 5-year Community Forestry Management Plan.
Please RSVP by Friday, September 19th by emailing Lisa Simms at njtf1@juno.com
If you would like send a representative(s), please include their names and contact information (email address). 
 
Seminar#2 information
Date:  Friday, November 7th
Time: Registration begins at 9:00am. Program starts promptly at 9:30 AM am and runs until 11:30am
Place: Secaucus Public Library, 379 Paterson Plank Road, Secaucus, NJ.
Light refreshments will be served.
This seminar is worth 2 Continuing Education Units for towns with a 5-year Community Forestry Management Plan.
Please RSVP by Friday, October 24th by emailing Lisa Simms at njtf1@juno.com
If you would like send a representative(s), please include their names and contact information (email address). 
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Double-Leader Tree Splits – No Damage!

My neighbor had a very large, very old, double-leader oak tree in his back yard. The other day, we heard a huge crash! It was a sunny, windless day. But that mighty oak lost one of its leaders (stems). Luckily, no one was hurt and no property was damaged. So, what is my point? We inspect street lights, telephone poles, sidewalks, etc. to make sure they are stable and cannot hurt anyone. Yet, in parks and at schools where adults and children gather, we never think to inspect our trees. What if that double-leader oak tree was located in a park, next to a playground, and on a sunny, windless day, one of those leaders came crashing down…?